The Ultimate List of 100 Things to Do on Oahu

100 Things to do on Oahu opener
As an Oahu local, I know there are so many things to do on Oahu, Hawaii, especially considering its less than 600 square miles. From beaches to hikes to festivals to restaurants, Oahu really does have it all.

Many “100 Things to Do” lists seem like the writers tried too hard to get to 100. Like they should’ve stopped at 80, but instead they ended up giving you 20 extremely boring activities that you could do in your hometown. I tried very hard NOT to make that happen. Each of these activities is something that I love doing, want to do, or would highly recommend that those visiting Hawaii do in order to properly experience the local culture. There aren’t any fluff activities in here. As a matter of fact, I combined a couple of the things to do to avoid the title being a weird “102 Things to Do on Oahu.”

With that said, I hope you enjoy this thoroughly thought-out list of things to do on Oahu.

Watch a Surf Competition at Pipeline

1. Watch a Surf Competition at Pipeline

Banzai Pipeline on the North Shore of Oahu is the place to go to watch surfers. Throughout the winter months when waves reach 20 feet (or 40 feet for anyone who’s not local – we measure wave size differently), there is bound to be a surf competition happening. From Da Hui Backdoor Shootout to Eddie Aikau Big Wave Invitational to Billabong Pipe Masters, there’s definitely something happening.

2. Take an ATV Tour at Kualoa Ranch

Rev up your engines! It’s time to take an ATV Tour of Kualoa Ranch! Kualoa Ranch alone is such a naturally beautiful landscape with the Koolau Mountains and the views of Kaneohe Bay. But then to get an amazing tour showcasing various movies filmed on the property, Hawaiian mythology, and if you’re lucky some local fruits straight of the tree ALL WHILE ON YOUR OWN ATV, it becomes so much better.
Hang Out with Turtles at Laniakea Beach

 3. Hang Out with Turtles at Laniakea Beach

Looking to spot at turtle while you’re hanging out on Oahu? Laniakea Beach is the place to go for your best shot. While in the winter months it might be a rather rare (the turtles aren’t fans of the big waves), in the summer I’ve seen half a dozen of them just chilling on the beach.
Hoping to actually swim with turtles on Oahu? This post has got all the turtle-spotting information that you need to know!

 4. Go Cage-Diving with Sharks

Are you an adrenaline junky? Do you want to get face-to-face with sharks? Do you still want to be semi-protected by some cage bars? Why not go cage-diving on Oahu?

5. Find Some Wild Dolphins to Swim with on the West Side

You know all of those dolphin encounters in pools at hotels or theme parks? They aren’t worth your money. Instead, find some WILD dolphins to swim with on the West Side of Oahu.

Now, I will be the first to admit that trying to find these wild dolphins on your own can be quite difficult at times, even if you know the right location and the right time. Plus, it can require a lot of swimming. So to help make this process a little bit easier, Dolphin Excursions Hawaii, EO Waianae Tours, Wild Side Specialty Tours, and Dolphin Star are all companies that will take you to go see some wild dolphins!
Try a Malasada

 6. Try a Malasada

Malasadas are Hawaii’s replacement for the typical American donut. For a long time, Oahu didn’t have any donut places. No Dunkin’ Donuts, no Krispy Kreme, and no artisanal one-location donut shops. But we always had the puffy, fried, sugar-coated rounds of deliciousness.

Now the question should be, “Where can I get the best malasada on Oahu?” Well, there’s a debate about that. Most people will vote for the long-standing malasada joint: Leonard’s Bakery. But I think the new competitor, Pipeline Bakeshop & Creamery, is putting up a good fight!

7. Watch for Whales in the Winter

Whales migrate down to Hawaii in the winter, because the rest of the world is too cold for them. That means there are tons of whales hanging out in our oceans, making it the perfect time to see them.

*Note: the easiest way to know where the whales are is to look for their spouts!

*Bonus: it’s even possible to swim with whales in Hawaii during the winter!
Get Shave Ice from Island Shave Ice and Creamery

8. Get Shave Ice from Island Shave Ice and Creamery

Everyone will tell you to go to Matsumoto’s on the North Shore for shave ice on Oahu. No. I strongly disagree. As a matter of fact, I think it’s one of Oahu’s biggest tourist traps. The lines are too long, and the syrup is too sweet.

Island Shave Ice and Creamery has it figured out though! Their syrups are fruity, not just sugary. And the best part is that no one really knows about it (so no lines!)

Interested in trying all of Hawaii’s unique and delicious food? Here’s a Hawaii Food Bucket List. Try to complete it!

9. Tackle the 1,000 Steps of Koko Head Crater Hike

Feel like you can conquer 1,000 steps up an old rickety train track? Koko Head Crater Hike is the place to try it out!

Looking for another Oahu hike to do? Here are 15 of the best.

10. And Once You’ve Done That, Tackle the [Illegal] 4,000 Steps of the Stairway to Heaven

One of the most iconic things to do on Oahu is to tackle the Stairway to Heaven. But in case you didn’t catch my warning in the title, it is illegal! However, if you’re committed to doing this hike, here is a post to help you figure out the details.

11. Drive on H-3 through the Koolau Mountains While It’s Raining

One of the most awe-inspiring landscapes on Oahu is the Koolau Mountain range. And what’s even more amazing is that you can drive through it on one of our three highways! We’re talking about H-3. AND to add to the already stunning beauty and the accessibility, when it rains, waterfalls are created in every little nook and ridge of the already bright green mountain range. It’s magical.
Find a Secret Beach on Oahu

12. Find a Secret Beach by Driving Around and Finding a Bunch of Cars Parked on the Side of the Road

Whenever tourists come to Hawaii, they are convinced that we have secret beaches. And they’re right. We do. While sometimes we find out about these secret beaches from our friends, other times we find them by driving around, seeing a bunch of cars parked on the side of the road, parking beside them, and finding out where they went. (Hint: it’s usually to a secret beach or hike.)

Want an easier way to find some of Oahu’s most stunning beaches? Here are 10 of them.

13. Cliff Jump at Waimea Bay

Feel like experiencing just a little bit of the thrill? Cliff jumping at Waimea Bay is the activity for you! This fifteen-foot jump is a lot safer than it looks. The waves are chill, the water is deep, and hundreds of people do it every day without getting hurt. It’s got a pretty good track record.

Planning on spending the day on the North Shore but not exactly sure what to do? My Ultimate Guide to the North Shore of Oahu should help!

14. Dine at Opal Thai and Try the Signature Dish

I was hesitant to put restaurants on my list of the top things to do on Oahu, but a couple still made the list. One is the unique dining experience at Opal Thai. First, you won’t order for yourself; Chef Opel will choose for you. Are you ready for an experience like that?

Oh, and we can’t forget about the secret signature dish! If it’s your first time, Chef Opel will definitely give it to you. (I won’t spoil it for you!)
Looking for other tasty Oahu restaurants? Here’s a list of my faves.

15. Spot Rainbow Trees on a Hike (Or, If All Else Fails, at the Dole Plantation)

The tall trees that look like they have been painted with bright orange and lime green, famously known as rainbow trees, can be found at several hidden locations across Oahu – particularly on hikes. However, if you’re not a hiker or you’ve tried looking and have had no luck, there are quite a few at the Dole Plantation (near the exit to the train ride, kind of next to the patch of the different varieties of pineapple).
Kayaking to the Mokulua Islands Oahu

16. Kayak to the Mokes

As such an ocean-centric community, it is possible to do every and any water activity on Oahu. One of my favorites is kayaking. And the most popular place to kayak on Oahu is the Mokulua Islands, also known as “the Mokes.” Kayak through the stunning waters of Kailua Beach and maybe do a short hike once you reach the island!

Want more information about kayaking to the mokes? Or maybe looking for another kayaking adventure? This post has everything you need to know!
Paddleboard to and Hike Chinaman's Hat

17. Paddleboard to and Hike Chinaman’s Hat

One of the most unique things to do on Oahu is what I like to refer to as the adventures of Chinaman’s Hat. In order to safely get to the island commonly referred to as Chinaman’s Hat, one must either kayak or paddleboard over. And because I just recommended a kayaking adventure to the mokes, why not paddleboard over to Chinaman’s Hat?

Then, once you get to the island, you have a gruesome 20-minute hike waiting for you. But at the top, all of that effort is completely worth it. The views of the Pacific Ocean and the Koolau Mountain Range are absolutely stunning.

Here’s a post for you with more details about how exactly to pull of this Chinaman’s Hat adventure.

18. Help Remove Invasive Plant Species with Travel2Change

Travel2Change is a nonprofit organization that encourages travelers to do their part to offset the negative environmental impact caused by travel. (I mean think of all that pollution your plane ride created!) On Oahu, Travel2Change offers many opportunities to do so from hikes to kayaking adventures to beaches. On many of these adventures, the Travel2Change team guides volunteers to remove invasive plant species, as they can harm and overrun the rare native plant species of Hawaii. Consider doing your part to help the special environment on Oahu!

19. Go to the Makapuu Tide Pools

The Makapuu Tide Pools are a hidden cove of tide pools just off of the easy Makapuu Lighthouse hike. Chill in one of the pools and watch the waves crash in. But be sure to watch out for the sea urchins!
Hike to Lanikai Pillbox for Sunrise

20. Hike to Lanikai Pillbox for Sunrise

If your goal is to find the most amazing spot to watch an Oahu sunrise, Lanikai Pillbox is definitely the spot for you. Regardless of the time of day, the Lanikai Pillbox hike is definitely one of the best things to do on Oahu. But doing it at sunrise just makes it all the more spectacular.

Do you want to hike to Lanikai Pillbox for sunrise? Here’s everything you need to know.
Or if you’re looking for a less popular Oahu sunrise hike, we’ve got you covered too.

21. Try on an Aloha Shirt from Rix Island Wear

You know those tacky aloha shirts (what mainlanders call “Hawaiian shirts”)? You know, those matching brightly colored shirts used for family photos on the beach? Well, that’s NOTHING like the aloha shirts from Rix Island Wear. Rix Island Wear has muted down background colors, like olive green or greyish blue, with the leaf patterns splayed in black or toned-down white. Their designs are so professional that locals actually wear them on a daily basis to their jobs!

Aloha shirts from Rix Island Wear are the perfect gift to give to people after your trip to Hawaii! Here is a list of some of the others (that you can buy online too!)
Devour a Dole Whip at the Dole Plantation

22. Devour a Dole Whip at the Dole Plantation

Dole whips from anywhere except the Dole Plantation are subpar. That’s why you have to devour a Dole whip at the Dole Plantation. I personally prefer the one with pineapple topping around the edges.
*Bonus: it’s vegan! And even better, it doesn’t taste vegan!
*Local Tip: if you have a local friend, they can get a discount with his or her Hawaii ID.

It should definitely be a stop on your North Shore day trip.

23. Walk Around the Streets of Kakaako and Watch Artists Paint the Walls for the PowWow Hawaii Festival

PowWow Hawaii! is easily the coolest art festival in Hawaii. Artists from across the globe come each February to paint the walls of Kakaako with stunning murals.

If you don’t happen to be on Oahu in February, you can walk around Kakaako and see their work still standing.
Swing Off the Rope at Waimano Falls

24. Swing Off the Rope at Waimano Falls

Waimano Falls is one of the more difficult legal waterfall hikes on Oahu. But at the end, the result is totally worth it. Not only do you end up at a stunning 25-foot waterfall, but you also will find yourself at a pool with a rope to swing off of! It’ll make you feel just like Tarzan!
Want to do a waterfall hike on Oahu, but this one just isn’t your style? Here are seven more!

25. Skydive at Dillingham Airfield

Do you want to have the most memorable trip of all time? It’s not enough to just come to Hawaii. But it may be enough to skydive in Hawaii. There are a few skydiving companies based at Dillingham Airfield on the North Shore, including Pacific Skydiving and Skydive Hawaii.

26. Zipline at Keana Farms (For Three Hours)

At Keana Farms, they have a three-hour ziplining tour. That’s an insane but awesome amount of time to be ziplining. And you’ll also get to find out a lot of interesting information about Keana Farms, the North Shore, and Hawaii in general.

27. Hop on Board the Hawaiian Railway Society’s Daily Train Ride

If you’re taking a family vacation to Hawaii with some little toddlers, you may be looking for something a little more chill than skydiving and ziplining. Instead, take a train tour across a good portion of West Oahu, as run by the Hawaiian Railway Society.

*Bonus: there’s a stop for ice cream (for the kiddos) and coffee (for the adults).
Watch the Sunset at the Ko Olina Lagoons

28. Watch the Sunset at the Ko Olina Lagoons

The sunsets at the Ko Olina Lagoons are actually so stunning that I’ve written an entire post on it! As a matter of fact, the photo above is completely unedited! From the stunning colors to the perfect angle, Ko Olina’s the place to go for an amazing sunset.

Staying in Ko Olina and looking for other activities to do in the area? This Ultimate Guide to the Ko Olina Lagoons has everything you need to know.

29. Find the Mermaid Cave

One of Oahu’s best hidden secrets is the Mermaid Cave. It took me years to find its location – and I’m a local! Let’s see if you can find it!
*Note: certain aspects of finding the mermaid cave may be dangerous. Please do your research (particularly about the tide. We want it to be low and stay low.) before heading out.

30. Do a Beach Clean-Up or Hike Clean-Up

We all know that the nature on Oahu is beautiful. But in order to keep it that way, we all need to do our part. Consider dedicating a few hours of your trip to do a beach clean-up or hike clean-up. Picking up a just a few pieces of trash could make more of a difference that you know.
Hike to Lulumahu Falls

31. Hike to Lulumahu Falls

Lulumahu Falls is one of the largest waterfalls on Oahu. With a relatively simple hike, you can reach this 30-foot waterfall. And if you get lucky, you might get the place all to yourself! But disclaimer, because it crosses onto private property for a bit, it’s illegal.

32. Visit the Polynesian Cultural Center

The Polynesian Cultural Center is such a unique cultural experience on Oahu. Learn about many Polynesian islands and their cultures! See hula dancers and fire dancers! Take part in a luau! Maybe even watch the evening show, “Ha: Breath of Life.”

33. Go to the Kapiolani Community College Farmer’s Market

The Kapiolani Community College Farmer’s Market is the place to go on Saturday mornings. This is easily the biggest farmer’s market on Oahu with vendors selling everything from locally grown fruits and veggies to high-quality beef to local honey. I would highlyrecommend a visit.
Get Poke from Taniokas

34. Get Poke from Tanioka’s

Poke – cubed fish with soy sauce and seaweed – is a dish that MUST be tried in Hawaii. I’ve had poke on the mainland (a.k.a. the continental United States) a couple of times, and it was terribly disappointing. On the whole, locals will agree that the best place to get poke is Tanioka’s in Waipahu.

If you’re looking for an authentic place to get poke that’s a little closer to you, here are a few more options.

35. Husk and Open a Coconut

This is much, much harder than it sounds. And if you look up videos of people doing it on the internet, it’ll still seem easy. (I mean, this guy manages to do it with his teeth!) But let me tell you from personal experience, it is not easy. Those husk fibers are ridiculously strong. And there are a lot of them all woven together, which just increases their insane strength.

*Tip: if you want to preserve the coconut water, make a small crack in the coconut shell and drip it into a cup.

*Note: if the coconut water is any color but clear, the coconut has gone bad.
Visit Hoomaluhia Botanical Gardens

36. Visit Hoomaluhia Botanical Gardens

You know all of those Instagram pictures of people standing on a wooden platform facing a lake with stunning green mountains in front of them? Or the ones where there is someone on a single-lane road with green plants growing on both sides and those same stunning green mountains in the background? That’s Hoomaluhia Botanical Gardens. Check it out.

37. Check out the Views from the Pali Lookout

The Pali Lookout is one of the only places on the island that you can drive up to (as opposed to hike up to) and get a breathtaking view of Oahu. From the Pali Lookout, you can actually see a good portion of the southeastern part of the island.
Immerse Yourself in Hawaiian History at Iolani Palace

38. Immerse Yourself in Hawaiian History at Iolani Palace

From 1882 to 1893, Iolani Palace was home to Hawaiian royalty, including King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani, Hawaii’s last reigning monarch. As a matter of fact, it is the only palace in the entire United States! And lucky for you, it’s open to the public!

39. Attend a Luau (Preferably One Hosted by Locals)

Luaus first came about in 1819, when King Kamehameha II decided to abolish the practice of men and women eating separately. In celebration of this declaration, King Kamehameha II planned a huge feast with both men and women.

Many locals today host luaus of their own with all the traditional dishes, including kalua pig, poi, and poke. While it may be difficult to get an invite to a luau hosted by locals, there are many other luau options, including Paradise Cove Luau, Germaine’s Luau, and Diamond Head Luau.

40. Learn How to Blow a Conch Shell

Blowing a conch shell is a symbolic part of many Hawaiian ceremonies – both past and present ones. It is typically blown to signal the official beginning of a ceremony. Furthermore, it is blown only during daylight hours (except for luaus), in certain directions, and a certain number of times. Each of these details symbolizes a specific meaning in the Hawaiian culture. That means that as you learn how to blow a conch shell, please be mindful of Hawaiian culture.

41. Find a Sunrise Shell (at Sunrise)

You know those bright orange and pink ombre shells that people commonly make jewelry out of? Those are sunrise shells. Why are they called that, you ask? It’s not only because of the color resemblance. It’s also because it’s much easier to find sunrise shells at sunrise (it has something to do with the tide.)! Are you up for the challenge?

42. Try Some Variation of Poi

Poi is a Native Hawaiian dish that comes from taro root. When the taro root is mushed into a purple sticky pudding consistency, it is poi. I’m personally not a fan of the sticky pudding consistency of poi, so I like it in bread form. It tastes like normal bread, but it’s a cool bright purple color.

You can find poi at several farmers’ markets across the island and even at the Whole Foods in Honolulu!
Find a Beach Swing

43. Find a Beach Swing

Beach swings seem to be most popular on the east side of Oahu. So when you see one, plop down on it and just enjoy the amazing view.

 44. Go to an Obon Festival

This Japanese Buddhist custom has become very popular in Hawaii. Around summer time each year, the Japanese Buddhists believe that their ancestors’ spirits return to the earth to visit them. Graves are visited, lanterns are hung, bon dances are performed, and food offerings are made. If you want to visit one, the Moiliili Obon Festival is the most widely attended Obon festival on Oahu.

45. Watch a Movie at a Consolidated Theater to See the Local Movie Intro

Before every single movie played at a Consolidated Theater in Hawaii, there is a little Hawaiian introduction with hula dancers, fire dancers, and even Native Hawaiian petroglyphs (the Native Hawaiian form of pictorial writing). Click here to find a Consolidated Theater near you!
Go to Lanikai Beach

46. Go to Lanikai Beach

Lanikai Beach is one of those picture-perfect beaches with beautiful turquoise waters and glistening white sand. While Hawaii has many of those, I think what separates Lanikai Beach from the rest is the fact that you can’t see or hear cars while you are there. There are houses and bushes blocking any sight of the street, truly making it one of the most relaxing things to do on Oahu.

47. Learn How to Make a Lei

Leis, which are like fresh flower necklaces, were used in native Hawaiian culture to indicate sacredness, status, and peace. Today, many hotels will offer leis to guests upon arrival. Women will usually receive ones made of orchids, and men will receive ones made of kukui nuts. In addition, many hotels also offer lei-making classes. The process is actually quite simple, as it only requires some flowers, string, and a long needle. Consider taking some time to learn about this special Hawaiian tradition.

48. Take a Helicopter Tour

On this list, I’ve already given recommendations of how to see Oahu from both on land and in the water. Now, I’m giving you a third option: in the sky. There are several companies that do helicopter tours over the island of Oahu, including Blue Hawaiian Helicopters, Mauna Loa Helicopters, Novictor Helicopters, and Paradise Helicopters. Take your pick! Maybe even consider doing a doors-off helicopter tour!
Play an Ukulele at The Ukulele Store

49. Play an Ukulele at The Ukulele Store

The Ukulele Store on the second floor of the Waikiki Beach Walk offers free ukulele lessons twice a day (10:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.). See if you can hit the right notes and even play a song! And, if this little introduction sparks your interest, there are dozens of ukuleles to choose from right there in the store!

50. Snorkel at Three Tables

When you look up the best things to do on Oahu, snorkeling at Hanauma Bay is undoubtedly going to come up. I would disagree. I think Three Tables on the North Shore provides a much better snorkeling experience. Colorful schools of fish and a couple of sea turtles swim around the intricate maze of coral below you. I will say that the current is much stronger at Three Tables than at Hanauma Bay, so please watch you position before you drift farther than you plan.
Visit the Byodo-In Temple and Ring the Bell

51. Visit the Byodo-In Temple and Ring the Bell

Nestled within the Koolau Mountains is the Byodo-In Temple. This temple is a miniature version of the Byodo-In Temple in Uji, Japan (which also happens to be a United National World Heritage Site). While at the Byodo-In Temple on Oahu, you must ring the giant bell. It takes some full body movement to get the momentum going. Traditionally in Japanese culture, this bell is rung 108 times on New Year’s Eve in order to get rid of evil spirits.

52. Get Lost in Ala Moana Shopping Center, the World’s Largest Outdoor Mall

Ala Moana Shopping Center is HUGE. I remember when it was SIGNIFICANTLY smaller – like could be walked crossed in fifteen minutes – and I still thought it was huge. And it’s just kept growing and growing since then. Honestly, you could probably find anything you want at Ala Moana Shopping Center. I mean, there are the fancy stores like Louis Vuitton and Salvatore Ferragamo, but there’s also Target. And then there are sit-down restaurants and a food court, but there is also a grocery store. Ala Moana has basically everything you could want. Just remember where you parked your car, because it might be hard to find at the end of the day.

53. Head to Ala Moana Beach Park for the Lantern Floating Ceremony on Memorial Day

Every Memorial Day, thousands of lanterns are set afloat in the Pacific Ocean from Ala Moana Beach Park. Each lantern has the name of at least one loved one who has passed away. It’s such a meaningful moment depicted in such a beautiful way.
Support Local Artists Like Nick Kuchar

54. Support Local Artists Like Nick Kuchar, Sarah Caudle, and Wooden Wave

Nick Kuchar designs some stunning Hawaii-themed vintage posters. Sarah Caudle creates realistic, sleek ocean scenes. Wooden Wave creates quirky, Hawaii-centric treehouse designs. All of them create magical work. Check out their art and support Hawaii’s artists!

55. Take a Ride in a Submarine

Want to get up close and personal with a bunch of Hawaii’s amazing sea creatures without getting wet? A ride in a submarine is a fantastic option. Maybe you’ll even catch a glimpse of Hawaii’s state fish, the humuhumunukunukuapua’a. The only company that does submarine tours on Oahu is Atlantis Adventures, so check them out if you’re interested!
Take Home a Jar of Smooth Big Island Bees Honey

56. Take Home a Jar of Smooth Big Island Bees Honey

I love Big Island Bees Honey. It’s so good. It’s probably the best honey I’ve ever had, and I go out of my way to try weird types of honey. My favorite type of honey is Big Island Bees’ ohia lehua blossom honey. The ohia lehua blossom is actually only found in Hawaii, so it’s definitely a unique one. While you may be able to find little taster packs at souvenir stores for quite an expensive price, Costco actually tends to have very large jars for a reasonable price. If you can’t find it there, Amazon has some for a bit more money.

57. Go to the Honolulu Fish Auction

The Honolulu Fish Auction is where all of the local restaurants (and even some mainland ones) get the freshest fish possible! The fisherman will come in with their catch of the morning and auction it off to the highest bidder. Be prepared to see some HUGE fish! It’s not uncommon to see 100-pound ahi!

To see all of this go down, you have to be prepared to take the Hawaii Fish Auction Tour at 6:00 a.m. (Yes, it’s very early.) For an hour and half tour, it’s $25 per person. Remember to bring some closed-toed shoes!
*Note: rumor has it that you can just show up and watch instead of paying for the tour. After all, you may be there to buy some fresh fish!

58. Spot a Mongoose

Mongoose are kind of like Hawaii’s version of squirrels. They are both commonly found in natural areas and both quickly scurry away from humans. With a similar physique to ferrets, these little creatures are most commonly seen at the Ko Olina Lagoons.
Watch the Waves Crash at Laie Point

59. Watch the Waves Crash at Laie Point

Laie Point is one of those viewpoints on Oahu that I think should be more famous. There is honestly nowhere else on the island that has the same view and the same crashing waves as Laie Point.

60. Buy Swimwear from Sundaze Bikinis (It’s Made from Cleaned up Ocean Plastic!)

Sundaze Bikinis is such an admirable company. They take ocean plastic that is harming the environment and turn it into a product that can be used to enjoy that environment! Plus, with their designs, you don’t have to worry about straps untying, which is a great bonus.

61. Embrace the Aloha Spirit and Let Someone into Your Lane While You’re Driving

There are some aggressive drivers across the mainland (a.k.a. the continental United States). On the whole, in Hawaii, we are pretty calm drivers (although the influx of people moving from the mainland has caused us to become a little more aggressive than before). Sometimes we’ll let people cross the street even if there’s no crosswalk. Sometimes we’ll let someone into our lane if they just signal. We’re just spreading the aloha spirit. You should try it out too!
Eat a Spam Musubi from 7/11

62. Eat a Spam Musubi from 7/11

I know. I know. It seems sketchy to get food from 7/11. And it kind of is. But you have to trust me on this one. Spam musubis are cubes of rice with a slice of spam on top, all wrapped in seaweed. And spam musubis from 7/11 are undoubtedly the best in Hawaii.
Don’t believe me? Honolulu Magazine, the most popular local magazine across the islands, backs me up.

63. Watch the Friday Night Fireworks at the Hilton Hawaiian Village

For some reason, watching the fireworks at the Hilton Hawaiian Village on Friday night has become a must-do for tourists. I’ll even admit that I’ve watched this firework show more times than I can remember! So lay out a mat on Waikiki beach and watch the colors burst in the sky!

64. Watch a Hula Competition

To the native Hawaiians, hula served as a way to remember their history, tell their stories, and keep their culture blossoming. When English missionaries came to Hawaii, they actually tried to suppress hula. But this valuable, culturally-rich tradition managed to pull through and is still practiced today. As a matter of fact, there are many hula competitions across the Hawaiian Islands. Some on Oahu include the King Kamehameha Hula Competition, the Prince Lot Hula Festival, and the World Invitational Hula Festival.
Drive Up the East Side of the Island and Just Stare at the Ocean

65. Drive Up the East Side of the Island and Just Stare at the Ocean

No one really tells you about the east side of Oahu farther north than Kaneohe. But the drive up that coast all the way up to the North Shore is breathtaking. You’ll be able to watch the color of the ocean start at a light turquoise and then fade into a darker blue as you continue.

66. Find the Lava Tube at Cockroach Bay

Here’s another one of those secret things to on Oahu. Are you up for the challenge?

67. Taste the Lilikoi Butter Mochi at Kahuku Farms (And While You’re There, Get an Acai Bowl Too)

For the longest time, I was convinced that the only way to get quality butter mochi was to get it from someone who made it at home. The ones you could buy at the store just didn’t hold up. That is until I tried the lilikoi butter mochi at Kahuku Farms. Not only did they make fantastic butter mochi, but they also added lilikoi to it! It’s fantastic.
*Note: butter mochi is different from mochi and mochi ice cream.
*Bonus: Kahuku Farms is also the only place on Oahu to sell acai bowls made from locally grown acai.

68. Visit the Pearl Harbor Memorial

On December 7, 1941, the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese Navy Air Service, which prompted the United States’ involvement in World War II. Hundreds of Americans gave their lives that day. Over 1,000 passed away on the USS Arizona alone.
A visit to the Pearl Harbor Memorial will allow you to learn about and remember December 7, 1941.
Spend Your Morning at the Aloha Stadium Swap Meet

69. Spend Your Morning at the Aloha Stadium Swap Meet

Aloha Stadium is Hawaii’s biggest stadium. Looking for a reason to visit but not all that into sports? Or looking for authentic souvenirs? The Aloha Stadium Swap Meet is for you! Find everything you could ever imagine from miniature surfboard to sarongs to tikis to local snacks.
Interested? Here’s a whole post on it!

70. Go to a UH Sports Game

In Hawaii, we don’t have professional sports teams. So instead, we root for our college teams, the University of Hawaii Warriors, as if they were professional sports teams. Maybe get in on the excitement by going to one of the UH games and cheering on the Warriors!

71. Stop by a Neighborhood Pride Shop

Recently, there’s been a lot of neighborhood pride happening on Oahu. #keepitkaimuki and #ourkakaako are growing hashtags. And guess what? This movement of neighborhood pride has a few shops to go with it! SoHa Living and Red Pineapple at Kamakana Alii have some West Side pride. And if you’re around Kaimuki, keep your eye out for a “Keep It Kaimuki” tote bag, because it can actually get you some discounts!
Watch the Water Spray Out of Halona Blowhole

72. Watch the Water Spray Out of Halona Blowhole

A blowhole is an interesting natural phenomenon. On Oahu, we only have one (well, one that’ll show up on a map): Halona Blowhole. In order for a blowhole to occur, there needs to be a series of events. First, there need to be some pretty big waves. Second, these waves need to crash into some rocks. Third, the rocks will need to have a decent-sized hole on them pretty close to the edge. Then, when the waves hit the rocks, the water will shoot up from the hole in the rocks, creating a sort of eruption-like image.

*Bonus: the Halona Blowhole almost always creates rainbows!

73. Spend Some Time at Waikiki Beach

I’m not a big fan of Waikiki Beach. At all. But it’s an iconic place, and if you’re a tourist in Hawaii and you don’t spend any time at Waikiki Beach, that’s a little bit weird.

74. Read Pidgin to Da Max at one of the branches of the Hawaii State Library

Pidgin to Da Maxis kind of like a hilarious dictionary of all of the words used in the local dialect known as Pidgin. Not sure what I’m talking about? Here’s an introductory post to get you started. And once you’re done with that, get your hands on Pidgin to Da Max. It’s definitely worth a read!
Get the Garlic Shrimp from Giovanni's Shrimp Truck

75. Get the Garlic Shrimp from Giovanni’s Shrimp Truck

Giovanni’s Shrimp Truck is hands down the best North Shore shrimp truck. They have two locations: one in Haleiwa and one in Kahuku. Don’t get fooled into trying a different shrimp truck. Oh, and remember, get the garlic shrimp! They’ll also have a spicy option, but if you value your tongue, taste buds, and entire digestive system, DO NOT GET THE SPICY SHRIMP! It is WAY too spicy for anyone! Honestly, I think they have it to taunt people’s egos into buying it. It’s a good marketing strategy, I guess.

76. Take a Drive on Lagoon Drive

For some reason, no one knows about Lagoon Drive. And honestly, I think Lagoon Drive is one of the most underrated places on Oahu. This drive is on a road right next to – I mean like INCHES away from – pale blue teal water. And this water is dotted with dozens of little rounded islands with a ton of trees growing on each of them. When you get to the end of the road, you’ll reach a parking lot where you can sit and watch planes fly over this beautiful landscape. Pretty awesome, right?

77. Paint Oahu’s Nature

One of the most unique things to do on Oahu is to paint Oahu’s nature. Even I haven’t gotten around to doing this yet, but it seems like such a cool idea! I would love to plop down at a beach or a botanical garden and just paint the landscape in front of me.

78. Go Scuba Diving and Find the Mahi Shipwreck

It’s time to strap on your oxygen tank and get ready to dive! Just a half a mile off of the west side of Oahu lies the Mahi Shipwreck. Because of all of the ocean coral and plant life that have started to grow on it, it has become a hub for sea creatures as well, making the experience just that much better. Interested? Kaimana Divers will take you there!
Take a Catamaran Ride Out Past Diamond Head

79. Take a Catamaran Ride Out Past Diamond Head

Want to get the best view of Oahu’s iconic Diamond Head? Take a catamaran ride. Hop on one of these boats at Waikiki Beach and get some stunning pictures. There are several companies that offer catamaran rides from Waikiki Beach out past Diamond Head.

80. Wander through the World’s Largest Maze at the Dole Plantation

That’s right. The tiny island of Oahu, Hawaii has the world’s largest maze. And we are committed to keeping the title. At one point in time, someone built a maze that was slightly larger. The Dole Plantation was not about that, so it expanded its maze and reclaimed the title. So it’s definitely worth a wander.

*Bonus: you can turn it into a competition! Who can complete and find their way out of the maze first?

81. Discover the Makua Caves

The Makua Caves out on the west side of Oahu are relatively unknown, but you can see some stunning views of that portion of the island from those caves.

82. Experience the Rain and the Sun at the Same Time

I’ve heard that in other places they call this meeting of events a “sun shower.” During the winter on Oahu, there’s a good chance you’ll experience this for a short while on any given day.
Discover a New Fruit in Chinatown

83. Discover a New Fruit to Try While Walking Around Chinatown

Rambutan, star apple, sapodilla, lilikoi, mango, star fruit, lychee, mangosteen, guava, papaya, strawberry guava, jackfruit, apple banana, breadfruit, mountain apple. Hawaii is the perfect environment to grow tons of weird fruits. Chinatown is the place you’re most likely to find them on any given morning.

84. Find the Petroglyphs at Nuuanu Memorial Park

Petroglyphs were the native Hawaiians’ form of pictorial writing. (Think of Egyptian hieroglyphics – kind of similar to that). On Oahu, there is only one place to for sure get a glimpse of petroglyphs. (There are rumors that you can see petroglyphs on some parts of the island when the tide is high, but I’ve had no luck.) That one place is Nuuanu Memorial Park. Drive to the end of the road and the parking lot. You’ll see a thin, slightly muddy path. Walk a few steps and on your left, you’ll see a small section that’s barred off. Peer through the bars and you’ll see a few petroglyphs!
Get a Delicious Fusion Brunch from Koko Head Cafe

85. Get a Delicious Fusion Brunch from Koko Head Café

Koko Head Café in Kaimuki is run by Chef Lee Anne Wong, who has been featured on several shows on the Food Network. This local chef represents Hawaii’s iconic fusion food so well. While my personal favorite is the Korean bibimbap, the most popular dish is the cornflake French toast. Oh, and don’t forget to try her interesting combination of fusion flavors in her dumpling of the day!

86. Try a Manapua

A manapua is Hawaii’s version of the Chinese char siu bun. And it’s delicious. It’s actually so iconic that we have someone known as the manapua man. See if you can find him!

87. Taste a Fresh Lilikoi (Or At Least Something with Lilikoi in It)

Lilikoi – also known as passionfruit – is absolutely fantastic. It melds together both tangy flavors and sweet flavors. If you haven’t tried it, try it. To find it, your best bet is to head to a farmer’s market.
Enjoy Some Mochi Ice Cream from Bubbies

88. Enjoy Some Mochi Ice Cream from Bubbies

Bubbies has been THE PLACE to go for mochi ice cream for as long as I can remember. (It’s much better than that boxed mochi ice cream sold in grocery stores for some reason.) Get flavors like sakura (cherry blossom), guava, mango, and lychee at their location in Hawaii Kai. Recently, a limited selection of flavors has become available at most Safeway and Whole Foods locations.

89. Find the Hidden Bridge Behind Maunawili Falls

Maunawili Falls is one of the most popular waterfall hikes on the island. But, to be honest, I always wondered why it was so popular. The waterfall wasn’t that big for the effort needed. But then I found out about the hidden bridge. It turns out that if you climb over the falls and wander down another, much less clear path, there is a hidden wooden bridge!

*Note: please try to find the bridge with someone who knows where they are going! We don’t want anyone getting lost.
Try Your Hand at Surfing

90. Try Your Hand at Surfing

You’re in Hawaii. We’re known across the globe for surfing. So something you have to do on Oahu is attempt to surf. Think about trying it out with an instructor on some very chill waves (in Waikiki perhaps?).

91. Try Your Hand at Body Boarding

Don’t have the balance for surfing? Try body boarding instead! Instead of using a huge surf board to slide down the waves, hang on to a little body board!

92. Or Maybe Even Body Surfing

If body boarding is still a little too difficult, body surfing is the easiest of all.

Step 1: Find a semi-wavy beach with no rocks. (I usually opt for one on the west side of Oahu.)

Step 2: Position yourself about five feet from the shore. Face your body towards the shore and your head towards the ocean.

Step 3: When you see a wave coming, paddle and kick as fast as you can!

Step 4: Slide onto the shore with the power of the wave.

93. Step into History at Honouliuli National Monument

In Hawaii, we are not ones to shy away from our history. The good and the bad. We remember King Kamehameha uniting all eight of the Hawaiian Islands. We remember the overthrowing of Queen Liliuokalani, the last ruler of the Kingdom of Hawaii. We remember the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. And we remember the internment camps that Japanese Americans were consequently forced into, like at the Honouliuli National Monument.

Built and used in1943, the Honouliuli Internment Camp was forgotten for quite a while, until it was rediscovered in 2002. In 2015, it was announced that this location would become the Honouliuli National Monument.

It is unknown when this national monument will officially open. While I will try to update this post when I hear news, your best bet is to check with the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii.
Hike Up to Makapuu Lighthouse and Take in the Views

94. Hike Up to Makapuu Lighthouse and Take in the Views

Makapuu Lighthouse is one of the easiest hikes on Oahu – if not THE easiest. And considering the stunning views that you get to see at the end without much effort, this is definitely one of the can’t-miss things to do on Oahu.

95. Stop by the Original Red Dirt Shirt Store

Something you may notice on your trip to Hawaii is that our dirt is red. Like bright red (it’s because it has a ton of iron in it). The Original Red Dirt Shirt store decided to capitalize on that fact. With several locations across the islands and even in Arizona and Utah, they are thriving. The only Oahu location is in Haleiwa, so be sure to make that a stop on your trip to the North Shore!
Munch on a Gyro at the Greek Festival

96. Munch on a Gyro at the Greek Festival

Most people think of Hawaii as a melting pot of cultures – but primarily Asian and Islander cultures. That is not quite the case, and the Greek Festival of Honolulu

97. Sip on Some POG

POG: Passion Orange Guava juice. The local drink of Hawaii (well, I guess, maybe I should include Kona Coffee too). You definitely need to try a glass on your visit to the islands. It’s served at many breakfast joints, but you can also buy some at grocery stores across the island.
is evidence of that. Every August, the Greek Orthodox Church of Honolulu hosts their annual Greek Festival as a fundraiser for their church. And let me tell you, their gyros and baklava are delicious!

98. Spot a Monk Seal

Hawaii is very much a refuge for sea animals – including monk seals. These creatures will just plop themselves onto a shoreline and sunbathe in the warm weather. I haven’t found any tricks to finding monk seals, so just cross your fingers and hope you see one!

99. Wander Around the Shops in Haleiwa

The shops in Haleiwa have this old-timey, slightly country feel to them. And inside they are selling tasty treats, delicious coffee, or the prefect souvenirs.

100. Swim with Stingrays at Electric Beach

So far on this list I’ve recommended that you see turtles, dolphins, whales, and monk seals. I’ve decided to add one last sea creature to your list: stingrays. While swimming with stingrays might seem like a scary thought (after all, they do have stingers), if keep your distance, you’ll be just fine!

Are there other things to do on Oahu that you think MUST be on this list? Or did you have an absolutely amazing experience doing one of these activities? Tell me about it in the comments! (I promise I’ll respond!)

Are you planning a trip to Oahu any time soon? Or maybe just dreaming about one? Pin this for later, so you don’t forget about all of these awesome ideas!

Disclosure: I use referral links in this post, and I might make a commission on my recommendations.

35 Replies to “The Ultimate List of 100 Things to Do on Oahu”

  1. What a thorough list and so many great ideas! We’ve been to Maui and the Big Island but not Oahu so I’ll be saving this for when we go! Thanks for the detailed post 🙂

  2. I loved everything about this guide! I used to live on Oahu and we still visit all the time. This is spot on. I’m embarrassed to say that Byodo-In Temple is still on my list to do! Do you mention plate lunch at all? Where’s your favorite place for plate lunch?

    1. Aw man, I knew I would forget something lol. Plate lunches are a must too! There are just so many cool things to do on Oahu! I know it’s cliche, but Rainbow Drive-In is a classic, so you can never go wrong there.

  3. Amazing list Sarah! Love the fact you included absolutely everything! Nature, Art, Food, Markets, Festivals – so perfect and useful for anyone who is heading there!

    1. Thanks so much, Maya! I definitely tried to include a little bit of everything, so everyone could have something on this list that fit their preferences :).

  4. That moment when you realize your trip to Oahu barely scratched the surface of fun things to do! I’ll definitely refer to your list for next time – I’m disappointed that I followed the crowd and went to Matsumoto’s initially. Glad to know there’s better shaved ice in Oahu! And you’ve got me intrigued by those mermaid caves. So excited to go back one day!

  5. Such a great list and a great reminder that I need to revisit Hawaii. I have done some of the things on this list but haven’t seen the pipeline competition. That would be so awesome to see in person.

  6. OMG! This is one heck of a list! I absolutely loved everything you mentioned here, however I am not sure how should I plan my stay to visit all of the places 🙂

  7. Such an awesome post about Oahu! I’d love to go here on vacation one day, it would be such a good time. I’ve always wanted to swim with the dolphins in Hawaii! 😊

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